Journal

Making Glass

July 1, 2020

Love this material and all it does. It’s a challenge to work with in every sense, but the results and the interplay with light that result as deeply satisfying.

We’ve been working towards finishing the making of all the blank for the new Red Clover bowl, and start the work engraving each bowl next.

Making a Red Clover Bowl

June 30, 2020

Dropping a foot, making a bowl for our new Red Clover limited edition. Our second seasonal design of 2020 a warm heliotrope bowl with a warm pink lip wrap, hand blown engraved glass.

The gather of hot glass is dropped from a bit iron onto the base of the bubble, cut free from the iron and shaped to form the clear glass foot on the base of each bowl.

 

 

Red Clover – Limited Edition Summer 2020

June 26, 2020

Our second limited edition design of 2020 is The Red Clover

Join our mailing list for the launch.

We make 75 small bowls H11cm ø15 cm and 25 large bowls H15cm ø18cm. Inside cased, engraved free blown glass.

The colour is on the inside of the bowl and this fine layer is engraved away to create the delicate design.

Of all the flower’s we have so far worked with, this sweet plant has one of the richest medicinal, folk lore and culinary purposes.

Clovers are rich in nutrients and vitamins and the leaves and flowers can be added to salads or used as garnish and the florets of the flowers can be individually plucked and sucked to taste the sweet nectar.

It’s so important for bumblebees and the flower is commonly known as Bee Bread.

The fourleaf clover will bring you luck in our time, but our forebares used it to ward off everything from evil spirits to freckles and give you the ability to see fairies.

The three leaved “Clover is a very shamanic plant allowing one to see into and interact with the Otherworld. It is a good talisman for protection and power for travelling out of body and walking between worlds.”

All in all, this is just a small sample of the folklore of this beautiful wildflower.

Plant Life – Fen Ditton Gallery

June 22, 2020

Plantlife is the third in an annual series of exhibitions at Fen Ditton Gallery that focus on the natural world.

A developing part of the gallery programme this series foregrounds artists, makers and designers across media who draw particular inspiration from the natural world and create memorable objects and images in response.

All exhibits are for sale and a proportion of sale proceeds will go to support Plantlife’s campaign for better management of road verges. You can learn more at plantlife.love-wildflowers.org.uk

Works range from a magnificent 2msq printed and stitched quilt by leading textile artist Pauline Burbidge to drawings by the sculptor Nigel Hall and black and white photographs by Lotte Attwood and Paul Hart. A new group of exquisite hand pierced and hand engraved Gingko leaf brooches by master artist-engraver Malcolm Appleby are complemented by a beautiful, hand-painted and pierced gold Daisy Necklace by Christopher Thompson Royds. Sculptor Lizzie Farey shows some of her vivid willow drawings and the art of engraving on glass is represented by a pair of Goosegrass vases from Katharine Coleman (this weed never looked so good!) and a glowing yellow Buttercup Vase by Yorkshire duo Studio Gillies Jones.

View Exhibition Here

Opening Our Doors June 15th

June 10, 2020

We are pleased to say, in accordance with the guidelines and current safety protocols, we will be opening our doors and resume our usual opening hours from next Monday :-
Monday – Saturday 10 – 4pm
Sunday 2 – 4pm

Both of Rosedale’s village tea rooms are open for takeaway tea coffee, cake and sandwiches.

If you can’t get here in person, our website has undergone a refresh which includes accepting international payments online and of course, keep an eye on our Instagram and Facebook accounts for pics and studio news.

We look forward to seeing you.

Stephen & Kate

Opaque Bowls – Forget me Not Blue

May 10, 2020

These bowls have been with us since we opened our doors twenty five years ago. It’s a timeless form and at home in a contemporary or traditional home. Hope you enjoy the pics of the colours of the bowls set against the wealth of colour in the natural word.

May 1st 1995 – The Beginning

May 2, 2020

On may 1st 1995, we opened our studio doors to visitors for the first time.

Not long after opening the doors our first visitor arrived and left with a decanter for his communion wine.

Thank you for everyone who has supported our craft these past twenty five years.

We would not be here without you.

Talk for Members of the Contemporary Glass Society

April 28, 2020

Together on Wednesdays
Our next lecture is:
Kate Jones of Gillies Jones on 25 years Making a Living Creating Glass
on Wednesday, 29th  April 7.30 – 8.30pm

Kate Jones is half of the Gillies Jones partnership; her current practice explores surface mark making and the landscape.   Kate has lectured extensively in the UK including work for Crafts Council and overseas with the British Council in Australia and India. She studied Fine Art in Stourbridge College of Art, glass at Brierley Hill and master classes at North Lands.

This talk is for members of the CGS. For more details have a look here CGS.

Thank you

April 28, 2020

We would like to say a huge thank you to everyone who has had added a Cowslip bowl to your collection.

Your support in these strange and difficult times is very much appreciated.

Very warmest regards from Rosedale

Stephen & Kate

 

The Cowslip

April 6, 2020

The Cowslip – our first limited edition bowl of 2020

Flowering around Easter the cowslip is one of the best known spring wildflowers.

In Rosedale Abbey, they grow between the stones of our driveway, a nodding cluster of delicate cup shaped flowers sitting atop tall stalks, the leaves an array of delicate greens.

A nostalgic symbol of flower rich pastures, once as common as a buttercup but depleted from the 1950s due to changes in land management, the cowslip is now regaining a foothold in roadside verges.

Highly valued since ancient times for its medicinal uses, the cowslip contains an oil known as ‘primula camphor’ that has the potential for use as an anti-inflammatory and antihistamine. Used to make wine, jam, tea and ointment, it is thought to be a good sedative and was used in the treatment of coughs and bronchitis. A tad topical… but don’t try this at home.

The folklore is rich, as is the origin of its name. In old English ‘cuslyppe’ translated to cowpat. Obviously, we prefer the more romantic adapted name, cowslip.

Our first seasonal design of 2020 is an edition of 100 bowls and is available for delivery only at present. View the bowls in our shop.

Very warmest regards from Rosedale.
Stephen and Kate